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Blaine Martin

consultant | Pittsburgh 347-708-7609

Expertise

Blaine Martinis a Consultant at Pay Governance and is based in Pittsburgh, PA. He has nine years of executive compensation consulting experience. Blaine's expertise includes competitive benchmarking for executives and outside directors, peer group development, compensation practices and trends analyses, short- and long-term incentive plan modeling, shareholder advisory modeling, incentive goal difficulty analysis, and pay-for-performance assessments.

Blaine is a contributor to Pay Governance’s research team and frequently co-authors papers on relevant executive compensation and corporate governance issues. His work has appeared in Agenda, the Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation, World at Work’s Compensation Focus, and The Corporate Governance Advisor.

Previous Experience

Prior to joining Pay Governance, Blaine worked in Towers Watson's executive compensation practice for three years.

Education

Blaine holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Economics with highest distinction from The Pennsylvania State University.


Other Posts by

Long-Term Pay-For-Performance Alignment: A 10-Year Review of CEO PSU Plan Payout Histories

With the introduction of say-on-pay (SOP) in 2011 and the increased clout of proxy advisory firms on executive compensation program designs, the performance share unit (PSU) has become a common feature of executive long-term incentive (LTI) programs among U.S. public companies. Continue reading

The Evolution and Current State of Director Compensation Plans

Over the past 20 years, there has been a major shift in how large public companies have compensated their outside Directors.1 These changes have included the elimination of Board meeting fees, granting of equity compensation in the form of full-value shares, the elimination of Director retirement plans and other perquisites, adoption of stock ownership guidelines for Directors, and giving of supplemental cash retainers to Committee Chairs in recognition of their substantial time commitments to committee work. Continue reading

The CEO Pay Ratio in Context: Framing the Narrative

If current legislation and SEC rulemaking stand, one big story in public company executive compensation during the 2018 proxy season will be the disclosure of the “CEO Pay Ratio.” Beginning for reporting periods starting on or after January 1, 2017 (spring 2018 proxy filings), companies will be required to disclose the median of employee pay excluding the CEO, CEO pay, and the ratio between the two. Continue reading

The CEO Pay Ratio Beyond Dodd Frank: Live and Local

Spring is in the air, and executive compensation consultants are busy reading a cascade of public filings and proxy advisor reports as we analyze and are asked to predict trends in executive pay in 2017 and beyond. One of the most common questions in executive compensation this year concerns what will become of the Dodd-Frank mandated CEO pay ratio set to be disclosed publicly for most companies beginning with proxies filed in 2018 – if not delayed or overturned beforehand. Earlier this year, acting Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) Chair Michael Piwowar took the unusual step of requesting additional comments on the cost and burden of complying with the already approved CEO pay ratio rule, which would require companies to disclose the ratio of CEO pay to that of the median employee. Continue reading

Did Say-on-Pay Reduce and/or “Compress” CEO Pay?

In the Dodd-Frank Act legislation after the 2008 Financial Crisis, the inclusion of shareholder SOP voting was driven by bipartisan Congressional support to “control executive compensation…” at corporations. In 2009, a former SEC chief accountant said, “Executive compensation at this point in time has gotten woefully out of hand… The time to adopt ‘say on pay’ type legislation is certainly past due.” Politicians, regulators, and some institutional shareholders clearly thought that, “The impetus for passage of Dodd-Frank’s say-on-pay requirement in 2011 focused on remedying ‘excessive’ CEO pay.”
Continue reading

The SEC’s Mandated CEO Pay Ratio in the Context of Income Inequality:Perspectives for Compensation Committees

At a recent Compensation Committee meeting, a director remarked, “As we discuss our CEO’s target compensation for next year, we need to remember that there is an ongoing debate about income inequality.” Income inequality and executive compensation are two of the most controversial issues in modern American economic and political discourse. The forthcoming mandated disclosure of the CEO pay ratio will link these two issues directly in the boardroom.

How much of the increase in inequality has been caused by CEO pay, and is this a failure of corporate governance?

This Viewpoint will provide some insights for directors and others into the answers to these questions in the context of the SEC’s mandated disclosure of the ratio of CEO to median employee pay. Continue reading

Press Release-Pay Governance Research Finds Strong CEO Pay-For-Performance Alignment

Our article was recently picked up by World at Work. Visit this link to be redirected to log in to their site. Our article has also been picked up by Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation. … Continue reading

CEO Pay-For-Performance: Highly Aligned When Properly Measured Using Realizable Pay

By Ira Kay, Lane Ringlee, Bentham Stradley, Brian Lane, and Blaine Martin   Partners Aubrey Bout Chris Carstens John R. Ellerman John D. England R. David Fitt Patrick Haggerty Jeffrey W. Joyce Ira T. Kay Donald S. Kokoskie Diane Lerner … Continue reading

Myths and Realities: Assessing the True Relationship Between Executive Pay, Share Buybacks, and Managerial Short-Termism

The past year has seen extensive criticism of share buybacks as an example of “corporate short-termism” within the business press, academic literature, and political community. The critics of share buybacks claim that corporate managers, motivated by flawed executive incentive plans (stock options, bonus plans based on EPS, etc.) and supported by complacent boards, behave myopically and undertake value-destroying buybacks to mechanically increase their own reward. Continue reading

Does the SEC’s New “Compensation Actually Paid” (“CAP”) Help Shareholders Accurately Assess Pay-For-Performance?

On April 29, 2015, the SEC released proposed rules on public company pay-for-performance disclosure mandated under the Dodd-Frank Act. Pay Governance has analyzed the proposed rules and the implications for our clients’ proxy disclosures and pay-for-performance explanations to investors. We are concerned about the validity of describing a company’s pay-for-performance alignment using the disclosure mandated under the SEC’s proposed rules, and its implications for Say on Pay votes. Continue reading

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