Tag Archives: 162(m)

IRS Issues Section 162(m) Guidance

Section 162(m) was added to the Internal Revenue Code (IRC) in 1994 in what was seen as a reaction to escalating executive pay. Commonly referred to as the “$1 million pay cap,” Section 162(m) denied subject companies the corporate tax deduction for compensation paid to the CEO (referred to as the Principal Executive Officer or PEO) and other proxy-named executive officers (NEOs) that exceeded the $1 million statutory limitation. Exceptions to the amount of covered compensation pursuant to Section 162(m) were permitted if such compensation was deemed “performance-based” under shareholder-approved plans. Continue reading

The Elimination of the Performance-Based Requirement Under Section 162(m):

Any changes to long-standing executive pay rules-regardless of whether they concern taxes, accounting, or regulations-raise questions and uncertainty about whether they will lead to wholesale changes in how executive pay is delivered. Continue reading

Tax Cuts and Jobs Act Become Law

On Friday, December 22, 2017, President Trump signed into law the most comprehensive overhaul of the U.S. tax code since 1986.

The purpose of this Pay Governance Viewpoint is to provide an overview of the law’s key provisions that affect corporate executive compensation programs. In the coming weeks, Pay Governance will write an in-depth series of tax law Viewpoints concerning executive compensation. Continue reading

Tax Cuts and Jobs Act Would Significantly Impact Executive Compensation Arrangements

On November 2nd, the House Ways and Means Committee introduced its tax reform bill, referred to as the ‘Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.’ Our initial review of the bill identified a few provisions which could have significant implications for organizations’ compensation and incentive programs. Continue reading

Alternatives to Quantitative Metrics in Performance Share Plans: Use of Strategic Objectives

Companies have migrated a significant portion of equity compensation to performance-based long-term incentive (LTI) awards—typically performance shares or stock units (PSUs)—from stock options. Over 80% of companies in the S&P 500 now have such plans; these also now comprise the majority weighting among LTI vehicles. This trend has been driven in, large part, by the desire of Compensation Committees to place at least one-half equity compensation in the form of “performance-based” pay as defined by the proxy advisory firms. Continue reading

Strengthening Executive Pay and Performance Alignment by Using a 162(m) “Umbrella” Plan Design for Performance Shares

Performance-based long-term incentive (LTI) awards—typically performance shares or stock units (PSUs)—are a large component of annual LTI awards for executives at most companies . Compensation committees continue to wrestle with the various design considerations associated with PSUs. Continue reading

Executive Compensation Litigation: Recent Cases and Efforts to Mitigate Potential Exposures

During the last few years, executive compensation has been a favorite target of the plaintiff’s bar in shareholder derivative litigation. Continue reading

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