Tag Archives: Say on Pay

Assessing ISS’ Newly Selected GAAP Financial Metrics for CEO P4P Alignment: How Can Companies Respond?

Say on Pay (SOP) and shareholder advisor vote recommendations have caused a dramatic increase in the use of relative total shareholder return (TSR) as a long-term incentive (LTI) plan performance metric. Continue reading

Over the Long Term, Companies with Problematic Pay Practices Generally Perform Worse than Companies that Avoid Problematic Pay Practices

Since advisory Say on Pay (“SOP”) votes became effective in 2011, ISS and Glass Lewis have exerted significant influence over the vote outcomes for these proposals. These advisors use quantitative tests to assess CEO Pay for Performance (“P4P”) alignment and supplement those quantitative assessments with a qualitative review of pay practices/program design. Continue reading

Did Say-on-Pay Reduce and/or “Compress” CEO Pay?

In the Dodd-Frank Act legislation after the 2008 Financial Crisis, the inclusion of shareholder SOP voting was driven by bipartisan Congressional support to “control executive compensation…” at corporations. In 2009, a former SEC chief accountant said, “Executive compensation at this point in time has gotten woefully out of hand… The time to adopt ‘say on pay’ type legislation is certainly past due.” Politicians, regulators, and some institutional shareholders clearly thought that, “The impetus for passage of Dodd-Frank’s say-on-pay requirement in 2011 focused on remedying ‘excessive’ CEO pay.”
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Resisting Homogenization of the Executive Pay Program – Update Motivating the executive team while satisfying shareholders and achieving successful Say on Pay votes

In today’s environment, with annual Say on Pay (SOP) votes, intense external scrutiny and the need to strongly align pay with performance, it is increasingly important for companies to be confident in their executive pay program. The foundation of a sound executive pay program is built on the company’s business strategy and talent needs, which, collectively, must be achieved in order to create shareholder value. Continue reading

Comparing Compensation: Trends in Executive Pay

Agenda published their 2nd Quarter publication and included quotes from Aubrey Bout and Steve Pakela of Pay Governance. “One of the best parts of say on pay is shareholder engagement,” says Aubrey Bout, a partner with Pay Governance. “That is … Continue reading

Are ISS and Glass Lewis Say on Pay Voting Policies Correlated with Improved Total Shareholder Returns?

The vast majority—98%—of companies have passed their annual say on pay votes (SOP) over the past four years. Proxy advisor voting recommendations remain highly influential on these votes, and many companies, perhaps hundreds, have changed the structure of their executive pay programs to try to comply with proxy advisor policies and to obtain a “FOR” SOP vote recommendation from proxy advisors. Continue reading

Does a Say on Pay Failure Affect Future Share Price Performance?

As companies approach the upcoming proxy season, Say on Pay (SOP) once again becomes top of mind for Compensation Committees and corporate management. Over the past 4 years since SOP proposals became mandatory under Dodd-Frank, shareholders have continued to show overwhelming support for executive pay packages despite continued criticism by media and other outlets. Continue reading

Say on Pay Voting

Ongoing Say on Pay voting results as of July 30, 2014. Continue reading

Say on Pay Voting

Updated Say on Pay voting results as of June 2, 2014. Continue reading

Direct Shareholder Engagement on Say on Pay: Circumventing the Perceived Hegemony of Proxy Advisors

In the three years that U.S. public companies have held non-binding Say on Pay (SOP) votes under the Dodd Frank Act, compensation committees, compensation advisors, and financial regulators have seen the clout of Institutional Shareholder Services (ISS) increase dramatically in the executive compensation arena. Continue reading

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