Current Pay Governance Viewpoints

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    Continue Paying Executives for Performance: A Rebuttal to the HBR Article “Stop Paying Executives for Performance”

    By Ira T. Kay and Lane T. Ringlee

    The Harvard Business Review [HBR] recently published an article, “Stop Paying Executives for Performance,” by Professor Dan Cable and Associate Professor Freek Vermeulen of the London Business School. The authors present arguments and analysis that incentives do not motivate executives to improve corporate performance. In fact, they argue that incentives might damage performance. Read More

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    Two New and Important Regulatory Developments Impacting the Financial Services Sector

    By John R. Ellerman and Lane T. Ringlee

    Last month, U.S. regulatory agencies released two sets of new rules affecting executive compensation. One set of the new rules has been developed by the Department of Labor (DOL) and deals with defining who is a fiduciary pursuant to rendering investment advice with respect to an employee benefit plan (subject to ERISA) or an individual retirement account (IRA). The DOL’s fiduciary rule is considered to be a Final Rule and will become applicable on April 10, 2017. The second set of rules is a proposal by six U.S. financial regulatory agencies (Securities and Exchange Commission, Federal Reserve Board, Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, National Credit Union Administration, and Federal Housing Finance Agency) setting forth new policies and rules pertaining to incentive compensation plans of certain financial institutions. Read More

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    Disclosure of Prospective Executive Compensation in the Upcoming Proxy and CD&A

    By John R. Ellerman and Lane T. Ringlee

    Proxy executive compensation and Compensation Discussion & Analysis (CD&A) disclosure is principally based upon a one-year look back at executive compensation forms, levels, policies, and practices. In addition, the proxy tables and schedules which disclose the historical pay forms and levels for the Named Executive Officers (NEOs) are fixed in format and do not allow for any flexibility in reporting NEO compensation beyond that which is prescribed by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). Read More